#1 d in last season in his comeback year von lebaobei123 28.03.2019 02:20

FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. -- Tony Gonzalez is having a harder time saying goodbye to the NFL than he imagined. As he prepares to host 40 family members and friends in Atlantas season finale, Gonzalez sounds as if he isnt entirely ready to walk away. When the Falcons announced in March that he would return this year, the 13-time Pro Bowl tight end was "100 per cent certain" he would retire after the season. Now Gonzalez wonders if he could change his mind again if Atlanta returns to playoff contention next fall and general manager Thomas Dimitroff gives him a call. "Id have to cross that bridge when I get to it, but right now I dont have any plans," he said. "I know for sure I wont be on an opening day for roster anybody. Im going to-- this is it. This is it." Meeting with reporters Friday, Gonzalez focused most of his answers on the end of his career. The 37-year-old insisted that hes pleased to "go out on his own terms" and added that hes "thankful for the opportunity" to have stayed healthy and productive for 17 seasons. Gonzalez ranks second in career catches, fifth in yards receiving and sixth in touchdown catches. No NFL tight end ever put up such numbers, but Gonzalez hardly returned this year to pad his stats. He craved playing in his first Super Bowl, winning a championship and making a legendary exit. The Falcons, though, never had a chance. Julio Jones, Sam Baker and Kroy Biermann suffered season-ending injuries. Sean Weatherspoon played in only seven games. Roddy White made 12 starts and Steven Jackson made 11, but both players were hurt most of the year. Quarterback Matt Ryan was harassed all season behind a weak offensive, and Atlantas defence was gouged repeatedly for big plays. Not surprisingly, Gonzalezs production dropped off as opponents double-teamed his routes. In October and early November, Gonzalez openly discussed his frustration and held out hope that the Falcons could still turn the season around. By the first of December, though, Gonzalez took a different approach with reporters, reminiscing about his early morning drives from hectic Buckhead to the picturesque mountain view at team headquarters. He talked about missing quality time with his kids but also feeling grateful to former teammates and coaches in Kansas City and those hes worked with in Atlanta the last five years. "I know I could come back and play a couple of more years if I wanted to, but its time for me to go," Gonzalez said. "Its time for me to get back to my family, get back to California, where Im from and explore that next chapter of my life. Im going to have fun with it." Television work is a possibility for Gonzalez, but playing football might not be out of the question. The Falcons, after all, signed him to a two-year, $14 million contract last March, and if they get off to a strong start next season, Gonzalez might reconsider, but he stopped short of saying that he plans to file retirement papers with the NFL. Then again, the aches and pains of a 16-game season arent getting easier, this despite the Falcons allowing him to miss over three weeks of training camp and preseason games last summer. "Like I said, dont anybody ever feel bad for me," Gonzalez said, smiling. "The things Ive accomplished in my career are more than anybody ever deserves." With one full day remaining before Atlanta (4-11) hosts the playoff-bound Carolina Panthers (11-4), Gonzalez is eager to go out with a victory. He had a good ride with the Falcons in his first four years, helping the team go 45-19 and win his first playoff game last January. But after narrowly beating Seattle in the divisional round, Atlanta fell 10 yards short against San Francisco in the NFC title game. "You never know when it can come to an end, and thats always been my approach," Gonzalez said. "Ive never said that Ive arrived with my accomplishments. Ive never, ever said that thats good enough for me or Ive caught enough balls to last a lifetime. I always wanted to keep working and keep working in case this is it, and now that Im coming into my last one, Im glad Ive done it that way. "It worked out, and hopefully Ill carry those habits into my next career, whatever that is." Wholesale Vans Authentic Shoes . Crawford hit his slam off Pirates starter Edinson Volquez to give San Francisco a four run lead in the fourth and they never looked back. Brandon Belt had three runs batted in as well. Bumgarner pitched all nine innings and allowed just four hits. Discount Vans Trainers . The outdoor event will be played on Dec. 31 between alumni of the New York Rangers and Philadelphia Flyers at Citizens Bank Park, the home of the Philadelphia Phillies. http://www.cheapvansdiscount.com/. Cesar said the difficulties he went through after the 2010 World Cup helped him become "a better professional" and made him "more focused" on his career. He admitted that he took things for granted before the World Cup in South Africa, when he arrived considered the worlds top goalkeeper. China Vans Shoes Wholesale . The 28-year-old lefty made his MLB debut in 2013, making 10 starts and going 2-5 with 4.05 ERA and 1.18 WHIP. Albers was named the Twins organizations minor league pitcher of the year for 2013. Cheap Vans Shoes China . The striker headed Spurs into a 35th-minute lead and tapped in their third in the 71st after Chico Flores own goal. Wilfried Bony hit the bar and had a good penalty appeal for a push by Tottenham captain Michael Dawson turned down in the first half, before getting Swanseas consolation late on.I always enjoy going over the baseball transactions every day just to follow the career paths of players or coaches, or even managers, I may have dealt with in the past. The other day, one name in particular caught my eye: Roy Howell signed on to be the manager of the Seattle Mariners Triple-A farm club in Tacoma. Of course, I had to make sure, it was the Roy Howell I was thinking of and it turns out it was. Roy Lee Howell came to the Blue Jays in their very first season in 1977. He had the fiery red hair and, later, the beard to go along with his gamer personality. Howell, a third baseman by trade, was the fourth-overall pick of the Texas Rangers in the 1972 draft. In the spring of 1977, he lost the Rangers third base job to longtime Rangers star Toby Harrah. Pat Gillick quickly pounced and pulled off his first significant in-season trade in franchise history on May 7 of that year, getting Howell in return for pitcher Steve Hargan, infielder Steve Mason and $200,000. Howell never had great numbers, in fact, his batting average peaked at .316 in 1977 and his best production year was 1979, when he 15 homers and knocked in 72 runs. But that first year with the Jays, he had a game for the ages at Yankee Stadium, no less. Howell slugged a pair of home runs, two doubles and a single, driving in nine runs as the Blue Jays came up with, by far, their biggest victory of their inaugural season pummeling the Yankees, 19-3. Those nine runs batted-in in a game is still a franchise record. Remember that 1977 was the year the Yankees won their first of back-to-back World Series. Howell spent four years with the Jays, then moved on as a free agent to the Milwaukee Brewers and finally to the San Francisco Giants. He came into managing late. Only three years ago in 2011, he became the skipper of the independent Pennsylvania Road Warriors of the Atlantic League. After that, he worked his way up in the Mariners organization as a hitting instructor. He wasnt actually supposed to be the skipper at Tacoma this year, but then fate stepped in. John Stearns, who was coaching on the Ms big league staff had to step down for health reasons. Rich Donnelly, a long time Major League coach, who had just been hired at Tacoma was promoted to Seattle to replace Stearns and, just like, that Howell, at age 60, was the new manager of the Rainiers. I looked back at that 1977 Blue Jays roster and its interesting, if not amazing, how many got involved in coaching or managing after their playing days were done. The most prominent include Alan Ashby, who went on to become an even better broadcaster, Phil Roof, Ernie Whitt, whos managed the Canadian mens team among others, Canadian Dave McKay, who worked for many years in Oakland and St. Louis with Tony LaRussa. I counted nine in total, including Doug "tthe Red Rooster" Rader, who had big league managerial stints with Texas, the White Sox and the Angels.dddddddddddd Rader was also a coach on LaRussas staff in 1992, when they lost to the Blue Jays in the ALCS. Who knows? Maybe in the next couple of years Roy Howell will get his Major League shot. - Drew Hutchison will be starting for the Blue Jays Friday afternoon at Dunedin against Clay Buchholz and the Red Sox. If Hutchison continues to pitch the way he has this spring and holds his own against the BoSox, you can pretty much guarantee he will make the opening day roster as the number-four or five starter. Ricky Romeros big test is Tuesday at Lakeland against Detroit. Though Ricky has pitched well in two extended relief outings this spring, this will be his first start where he should face predominantly Major League hitters. If he gets through the outing unscathed, he will definately be in the conversation for the fourth or fifth starters slot. - The other day, a Tampa Bay Rays prospect by the name of Jeremy Moore crashed a monster home run off Marcus Stroman over the "batters eye" in dead centre field at Dunedin and drew the praise of skipper Joe Maddon. I wanted to learn a little bit more about Moore, so I did a little digging. He was a sixth-round pick of the Angels in 2005, a speedy outfielder who could handle all three positions well. Though he seemed to be progressing well through the minors, he was bothered by a bone spur and other issues in his hip. That seemed unusual for somebody so young, but doctors felt the beatings he took as a four-sport star in growing up in Louisiana, including football, had done the damage. Moore ultimately had to undergo hip surgery at age 24, though, thankfully, not hip replacement surgery like Bo Jackson. Moore missed the entire 2012 season before signing a minor-league deal with the Los Angeles Dodgers. After batting .211 with seven homers and 31 runs batted in last season in his comeback year, the Rays saw enough in him to sign Moore in January. Though he may be a long shot to make the Tampa Bay opening day roster, he has hit four homers this spring and has the versatility the Rays covet. Impressing Joe Maddon doesnt hurt either. Jeremy Moore is the kind of player you really pull for. - Andrew Marchand of ESPN New York pointed out that the Blue Jays could be on hand in New York for "Derek Jeter Day." Sunday, September 21, the Blue Jays are in New York and that is the Yankees final Sunday home game of the regular season. Nothing is official yet, but the Yanks did hold "Mariano Rivera Day" on the final Sunday of last season. So there is a chance, the Blue Jays will be part of the grand farewell of one of the Yankees all-time greats. ' ' '

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