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LONDON -- Canadas Eugenie Bouchard stumbled in her first two Grand Slam semifinal appearances this year. The third time proved to be the charm Thursday at the All England Club. Bouchard defeated Romanias Simona Halep 7-6 (5), 6-2 to become the first Canadian to advance to the womens singles final at Wimbledon. It was the latest achievement in what has already been a historic run for Bouchard at the sports most prestigious event. "After doing well in the past few (Grand) Slams, Ive been believing since the beginning of the tournament that I can do really well," she said. "Im just trying to take it one match at a time. Its really important not to get ahead of ourselves. "I totally feel like I belong, and Im just so excited for the next match." The 20-year-old from Westmount, Que., has yet to lose a set in her six matches so far at Wimbledon. No Canadian had ever reached the womens singles quarter-finals here in the Open era -- never mind the final -- before Bouchard. There could be a Canadian in the mens singles final as well. Milos Raonic of Thornhill, Ont., will take on Switzerlands Roger Federer on Friday with a berth in Sundays championship on the line. This is uncharted territory for Canadian tennis. Before this tournament, no Canadian had ever reached a mens or womens Grand Slam singles final, according to Tennis Canada. The last Canadian to reach a singles semifinal at a major was Robert Powell at Wimbledon in 1908, the organization said. Montreal native Greg Rusedski reached the U.S. Open final in 1997 but he was representing Great Britain at that time. The 13th-seeded Bouchard, who converted her sixth match point to complete the 94-minute victory, will next face sixth-seeded Petra Kvitova on Saturday. "To get to my first Grand Slam final, its very exciting. Its what Ive worked so long for, you know," Bouchard said. "So Im just proud of myself for todays effort." Kvitova, the 2011 Wimbledon champion, beat fellow Czech left-hander Lucie Safarova 7-6 (6), 6-1 in the early semifinal. Bouchard lost in the semifinals at the years two previous majors, the Australian Open and French Open. Shes projected to rise to No. 7 -- the highest ranking for a Canadian woman -- by reaching the final and would go to No. 6 by winning the championship. Bouchard would also be the youngest Grand Slam champion since Maria Sharapova won the 2006 U.S. Open at age 19. "Ive put in a lot of hard work and its been kind of years in the making to me," Bouchard said. "So I believe in myself and I expect good results. Ive had a good start to the season, but I expect myself to do even better than that." In a semifinal that was delayed twice in the first set -- first by a left ankle injury to Halep, and then when a woman spectator fell ill during the tiebreaker -- Halep double-faulted on break point in the second set and then was broken again by Bouchard to give the Canadian a 4-1 lead. The third-seeded Halep, who saved three match points in the seventh game and two more in the final game, appeared to be increasingly affected by her ankle injury and looked down at her feet several times after hitting shots. "It was difficult to continue ... I felt a big pain in the moment, but then was better with the tape," Halep said. "But still, I couldnt push anymore with my leg. My first serve was really bad after that." On Bouchards first match point, Halep hit an ace, but Bouchard did not appear ready to receive, and she went to speak with chair umpire Kader Nouni. But the point stood and Bouchard failed to clinch the match. "When Simona tossed I heard someone scream in the crowd," Bouchard said. "It had happened a few times already. This time I didnt feel prepared to return, so I put my hand up. I felt like we should have replayed the point, but he said, no, it was her point. Just happy I kept my focus and didnt get distracted." The tiebreaker was delayed briefly when the female spectator became ill. With Halep leading 3-2, Nouni jumped from his chair to alert security officials to the womans illness and told both players to go to their sideline chairs. Temperatures on Centre Court were 25 degrees Celsius under sunny skies. Following a delay of about five minutes and after the woman was escorted from the seating area by medical staff, the tiebreaker resumed. The woman returned to her seat later in the match after treatment. Halep had never been past the third round at a Grand Slam until last year, when she made it to the fourth round at the U.S. Open. Then she reached the quarter-finals at the Australian Open in January, and got to the final at the French Open last month, losing to Sharapova. In the first semifinal, Kvitova -- the only womens player born in the 1990s to have won a major title -- improved her record to 25-5 on the Wimbledon grass. The 24-year-old has made at least the quarter-finals for five years in a row. "I know how (it feels) when you hold the trophy so I really want to win my second title here and I will do everything I can," Kvitova said. She saved her best for last: Up to 6-all in the tiebreaker, Safarova had won more total points, 40-39. From there, though, Kvitova won 31 of the last 48 points in the match. Kvitova beat Bouchard 6-3, 6-2 in their only previous meeting, a second-round match at the Rogers Cup in Toronto last August. "I find her as a very solid and talented player," Kvitova said. "She is confident in her game right now. Shes moving very well ... shes playing aggressively." After sealing the victory, Bouchard appeared pleased with her performance but kept the jubilation to a minimum. "Its not like a surprise to me -- I expect good results like this," she said. "So for me, I was like, OK good. Its a step in the right direction. I get to play in the final and I still have another match so its not a full celebration yet." Bouchard is the only woman to have advanced to all three Grand Slam semifinals this year. The 2012 Wimbledon junior champion said shes proud to be the first Canadian to make it this far in the tournament. "Its always exciting and special when I can make history," she said. "My job is not done, I want to go another step further. So Im going to stay focused and enjoy it after." Also Thursday, Vasek Pospisil of Vancouver and American Jack Sock upset the second-seeded duo of Alexander Peya of Austria and Bruno Soares of Brazil in mens doubles quarter-final play. The third-seeded team of Torontos Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic of Serbia dropped a 3-6, 7-6 (7-5), 6-3, 6-4 decision to fifth seeds Leander Paes of India and Radek Stepanek of the Czech Republic. Top-seeded Novak Djokovic will play Grigor Dimitrov in the other mens semifinal Friday. The final is scheduled for Sunday. Cheap Cardinals Jerseys . -- The Orlando Magic finally are showing the patience in critical moments that coach Jacque Vaughn has been waiting for all season. Mike Matheny Jersey .Connor Graham, Alex Lintuniemi and Sam Studnicka also scored for Ottawa (11-8-2). Liam Herbst made 21 saves for the win.Brendan Lemieux had both of Barries (10-10-2) goals. http://www.cheapstlouiscardinalsjerseys.com/.S. womens soccer team to a 2-0 win over China in Colorado in the afternoon. Albert Pujols Jersey . Adam Lind provided the power and rookie starter Marcus Stroman had the best start of his young career as the Blue Jays dumped the Yankees 8-3 at Rogers Centre. Stroman, making his fifth start for Toronto, allowed one earned run and three hits over a career-high eight innings. Bob Gibson Jersey . Dallas also Monday recalled defenceman Aaron Rome from his conditioning assignment with the Texas Stars of the American Hockey League and assigned goaltender Jack Campbell to the AHL squad.TSN 1050s Scott MacArthur and TSN contributors Richard Griffin of the Toronto Star and Gregor Chisholm of MLB.com discuss why the Blue Jays are so inconsistent, J.A. Happs future in the rotation and manager John Gibbons usage of R.A. Dickey. Click here to listen to The Baseball Podcast. TORONTO - R.A. Dickey may have gotten the win on Tuesday night, his fourth victory of the season, but he suggested afterward he would spend the next 18 hours beating himself up over the way that seventh inning played out. Dickey started the inning with a 5-1 lead, the Jays had just scored three in the sixth to pad their advantage, but he wouldnt finish the inning. In fact, he didnt get an out over four batters. A lead off single by Asdrubal Cabrera could have been erased on a double play ground ball by David Murphy, but Brett Lawrie booted the hot shot at second base. A walk and a hit batter later, Torontos lead was cut to 5-2 and Dickeys night was over. Aaron Loup came in and chipped his way out of Dickeys jam, although two inherited runners scored to trim the lead to 5-4. That would be the games final score. The knuckleballer wants to pitch deeper into games but he knows his stat line isnt the top priority. "We want to win ballgames," said Dickey. "Regardless of how I feel about how deeply I go. If thats the right move, its the right move and if it ends in a win, great. I just think that Im more than capable with the stuff that I possess presently to be able to go deeper into games and I think I will." Dickeys thrown 53 2/3 innings over nine starts. Thats relatively simple math: hes averaging just less than six innings per start. Last year, Dickey averaged almost 6 2/3 innings per outing. There are a lot of starts left but using the current numbers, a two out per start difference means the Jays bullpen would be asked to pick up about 70 more outs in Dickeys starts over the course of a full year. "More frustrated is kind of how I feel," said Dickey. "I think some of its just baseball, i.e. a hit batsman or a single on a 1-2 count that you should have gotten the guy out on. I dont want to over-think it or overanalyze it but at the same time I also want to be honest about the things I maybe could do differently to get us deeper into the game." Dickey is healthy, something he couldnt say this time last year as he pitched through a strained muscle in his upper back. He isnt tiring later into games, something he suggested was happening earlier this season and when he studies his velocities inning-over-inning the readings reflect improved durability. Hes pleased just as much with the movement on his knuckleball. "I think, from my end, I just have to keep feeling good," said Dickey. "I think as long as Im healthy and feeling good over the course of the next 24 starts, quite a few of them Ill be able to go deeper into the game if I can just stay healthy." Dickey was drafted way back in 1996. He laughs when hes told it was 18 years ago, as if hes hearing it for the first time and ccant believe how quickly time has passed.ddddddddddddTheres certainly some truth to the latter. He remembers breaking into the game at a time when it was assumed starters would take the ball and for better or worse, keep it. "Its obvious that the majority of pitchers now, generationally that are new that come up into the game, have this 100-pitch threshold where its almost like theyve been convinced that thats as far as they are capable of going because thats always when theyve been taken out of games," said Dickey. "Early on, and Im talking about 2000, 2001 when I was first up, guys would routinely throw 120 (pitches) like it was nothing and they would just suck up the innings as much as they could." Dickey subscribes to the notion that strict pitch counts can affect a pitchers approach as a game wears on. "A starter that sees that hes close to 100 pitches maybe starts to anticipate that his time may be done instead of thinking to himself, Im going to keep going through this because this is my game," said Dickey. "Theres been a shift in mentality for sure." He remembers a start at Fenway Park last September. Dickey threw a complete-game eight innings in a 5-2 loss to the Red Sox. He was in trouble early but settled down, gave his team a chance to win and saved the bullpen a days work. He points to Drew Hutchisons start earlier this month in Philadelphia. Staked to a 5-0 lead and cruising, Hutchison coughed up five runs in the sixth inning but hung in to pitch the seventh and eighth. The Blue Jays would win 6-5 in 10 innings that night. "I do think that there are certain times on a case by case basis, depending on the game situation, where its good for the starter to grind through that seventh and eighth inning," said Dickey. "I did that a number of times last year when I would give up four or five runs and go seven or eight innings just to save the pen. Now, were early in the year, were trying to get wins, however (Gibbons) thinks that we can do that, thats what we should do." WAGNER ON THE CAROUSEL Neil Wagner is back with the Blue Jays, recalled before Wednesdays game against the Indians. Hes up for the second time this season. As a player with options remaining, trips to and from Buffalo are to be expected when part of an organization that sees value in regular player movement. "The fact that you know that thats just kind of how it is and that theres nothing that can be done about it doesnt make it any less frustrating but the bottom line is that if you go down there and put up your numbers and do your thing," said Wagner. "If you sit and mope youre not going to come back." Wagner replaces Chad Jenkins, who was optioned back to Buffalo for a third time, already, this season. Also, the Blue Jays recalled catcher Erik Kratz from the Bisons to fill the roster spot voided by Dioner Navarro, who was placed on the bereavement/family emergency list. Navarro can return at any time and has up to seven days to be away from the team. ' ' '

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